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Spring Meeting 2016

The Society conducts a Spring Annual Meeting in conjunction with the U.S.-Canadian division of the International Academy of Pathology (USCAP), attracting large numbers of registrants from both organizations. In addition, the Society holds a Fall Meeting each year at various pediatric institutions throughout North America. The Fall Meeting includes the presentation of papers and a symposium that draws upon the expertise of local faculty. An informal atmosphere allows for interchange among colleagues and an opportunity to visit the institutions of peers. Since 1978 the Society has presented the Sidney Farber Lecture which features an in depth view of current topics in developmental pathology.

SAVE THE DATE

2016 Spring Meeting will be in Seattle, WA
March 11th – 13th
Seattle Westin Hotel & Resort
1900 Fifth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101

Spring Meeting Documents

Spring Program

2016 Abstract Book

2016 Poster Presentation Schedule

2016 Platform Presentation Schedule

2016 Spring Business Meeting Agenda

2016 Spring Business Meeting Minutes

Preliminary Agenda

Friday, March 11:

Committee Meetings

Saturday, March 12:

7:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. Registration

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. Exhibits

8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. Poster Viewing

8:00 A.M. -10:00 A.M. Platform Presentations- (Renal and vascular tumors)

8:00 A.M. -10:00 A.M. Platform Presentations- (Gastrointestinal and perinatal)

10:00 A.M. -10:30 A.M. Break & Poster Viewing

10:45 A.M. -12:00 P.M. Poster Discussion Presentations 1 (Pediatric)

12:15 P.M. -1:15 P.M. Perinatal Section General Business Meeting

1:30 P.M. -5:00 P.M. Symposium: “Neonatal and Infantile Cholestatic Liver Disease” (Organizer: Pierre Russo, MD)

5:00 P.M. -6:00 P.M. Business meeting

6:30P.M. Banquet - President’s Inaugural address

Sunday March 13, 2016

7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M. Trainee/New Member Breakfast MC Arlington (Invitation only)

7:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Registration

8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Poster Viewing

8:00 A.M. - 9:45 A.M. Platform Presentations- (Neoplasia)

8:00 A.M. - 9:45 A.M. Platform Presentations- (Hematology)

9:45 A.M. - 10:15 P.M. Break & Poster Viewing

10:15 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. Poster Presentations 2 (Perinatal)

11:10 A.M. - 12:10 P.M. Farber-Landing Lecture – “Pleuropulmonary Blastoma”

12:10 P.M. - 12:30 P.M. Awards Presentation

1:30 P.M. - 3:30 P.M. Workshop Session I:

A.Year 3/3: Cytopathology of Pediatric Non-Thyroidal Head and Neck Masses with Histologic Correlates (Lisa Teot MD/John Ozalek MD)

B. Year 2/3: Pediatric Lung Biopsy: A Pattern-Based Diagnostic Approach & Update on Pathogenesis (Meghan Dishop MD/Csaba Galambos MD, PhD)

C. Year 1/3: Pediatric Kidney Biopsy Interpretation: Essentials for the Pathologist-on-Call (Robyn Reed MD, PhD/Aliya Hussein MD)

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM Workshop Session II:

D. Year 3/3: Pediatric Hematopathology Update (Michelle Paessler, DO/Gerald Wertheim MD/Rebecca King MD)

E. Year 2/3: Pediatric Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors: Pathology and Associated Syndromes (Bruce Pawel MD/Lisa Sullivan MD/Mariarita Santi MD, PhD)

F. Year 1/3: Adding Relevance to the Pediatric Autopsy with Defined Pre-autopsy Goals and Practical Techniques (Michael Caplan MD/Amy Sheil MD)

Presenter's Information

Education

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ACCREDITATION

Accreditation Statement

The Society for Pediatric Pathology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and The Society for Pediatric Pathology.

Accreditation and Credit Designation

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

International Physicians

The American Medical Association has determined that physicians not licensed in the US who participate in this CME activity are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) ™.

Health Professionals

Health Professional participants (including residents and fellows-in-training) may claim hours to receive a Certificate of Participation for an activity designated for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) ™.

Course Director

Sara Szabo, MD
Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Dept. of Pathology

Program Planning Group

Click here to see a full list of the individual planning group members.

Learning Objectives

As a result of this meeting, participants will be able to:

  • Acknowledge recent advancements in research and practice related to the biology, characterization and/or diagnosis of pediatric disease.
  • Identify areas with recent significant advancement in the practice of pediatric pathology.
  • Implement diagnostic and consultative management updates in pediatric pathology into practice.
  • Summarize clinicopathologic differential diagnoses and pathologic processes of perinatal and pediatric disorders and their complications, as well as their treatments and possible outcomes.

Target Audience

  • Pediatric Pathologists
  • Fellows-in-Training
  • Residents (Pathology)
  • Pediatric Gastroenterologists;
  • World renowned researchers in infantile cholestatic liver disease

Educational Need

Pediatric pathologists, pediatric pathology fellows, and surgical pathologists who evaluate newborn and infant liver biopsies need a concise, diagnosis-directed, clinicopathologic Symposium on neonatal and infantile cholestatic liver disease in order to appropriately diagnose the entities that comprise this complex group of disorders.

The differential diagnosis of the jaundiced neonate and infant is broader than at any other age. The liver biopsy is a cornerstone of the diagnostic work-up of infants with jaundice, and the wide range of disorders that can cause neonatal cholestasis makes interpretation of these biopsies challenging. The timing and expediency of the workup is in addition considered crucial because outcomes for a number of diagnoses are directly linked to early intervention, most notably biliary atresia. Furthermore, during the last decade there have tremendous strides in the identification of genetic mutations associated with numerous entities, such as Alagille syndrome and bile duct paucity[1, 2], the group of disorders referred to as progressive familial cholestasis[3-5], neonatal sclerosing cholangitis[6], lymphedema-cholestasis syndrome[7], the tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome[8] and fibrocystic disorders associated with nephronophthisis[9, 10]. More recently described disorders have also been added to the differential diagnosis of the jaundiced infant, such as citrin deficiency [11] and mutations of HNF1B[12]. The goal of this symposium is to provide a conceptual approach to the differential diagnosis of cholestatic liver disease, integrating advances in molecular diagnostics and immunohistochemical markers, as well as providing insight into the latest research developments that bear on our understanding of these disorders.

The broad range of disorders that can cause infantile cholestasis makes interpretation of liver biopsies challenging

The last SPP workshop pertaining to liver disease was presented in 2004-2006, but included a vast array of childhood liver diseases with a much broader scope than the current proposal and did not specifically target infantile cholestatic disorders. Increasingly, the pathologist needs to be conversant with and integrate clinical, biochemical and rapidly advancing genetic information to complement histologic observation and assist the hepatologist in the planning of further investigation and therapy. The pathologist must be familiar with the various genetic and immunohistochemical tests and their limitations in the diagnosis of hepatic cholestatic disorders.

Knowledge need: Pediatric pathologists, pediatric pathology fellows, and surgical pathologists who evaluate newborn and infant liver biopsies need a concise, diagnosis-directed, clinicopathologic Symposium on neonatal and infantile cholestatic liver disease in order to appropriately diagnose the entities that comprise this complex group of disorders.

The differential diagnosis of the jaundiced neonate and infant is broader than at any other age. The liver biopsy is a cornerstone of the diagnostic work-up of infants with jaundice, and the wide range of disorders that can cause neonatal cholestasis makes interpretation of these biopsies challenging. The timing and expediency of the workup is in addition considered crucial because outcomes for a number of diagnoses are directly linked to early intervention, most notably biliary atresia. Furthermore, during the last decade there have tremendous strides in the identification of genetic mutations associated with numerous entities, such as Alagille syndrome and bile duct paucity[1, 2], the group of disorders referred to as progressive familial cholestasis[3-5], neonatal sclerosing cholangitis[6], lymphedema-cholestasis syndrome[7], the tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome[8] and fibrocystic disorders associated with nephronophthisis[9, 10]. More recently described disorders have also been added to the differential diagnosis of the jaundiced infant, such as citrin deficiency[11] and mutations of HNF1B[12]. The goal of this symposium is to provide a conceptual approach to the differential diagnosis of cholestatic liver disease, integrating advances in molecular diagnostics and immunohistochemical markers, as well as providing insight into the latest research developments that bear on our understanding of these disorders.

The broad range of disorders that can cause infantile cholestasis makes interpretation of liver biopsies challenging

The last SPP workshop pertaining to liver disease was presented in 2004-2006, but included a vast array of childhood liver diseases with a much broader scope than the current proposal and did not specifically target infantile cholestatic disorders. Increasingly, the pathologist needs to be conversant with and integrate clinical, biochemical and rapidly advancing genetic information to complement histologic observation and assist the hepatologist in the planning of further investigation and therapy. The pathologist must be familiar with the various genetic and immunohistochemical tests and their limitations in the diagnosis of hepatic cholestatic disorders.

Competency need: Pediatric pathologists, pediatric pathology fellows, and surgical pathologists who evaluate newborn and infant liver biopsies need to be able to accurately diagnose the cause of cholestatic liver disease for a given patient in order for that infant to receive the appropriate medical therapy and/or surgical intervention and to maximize the chances for his/her best short and long term outcomes.

Performance need: Pediatric pathologists, pediatric pathology fellows, and surgical pathologists who evaluate newborn and infant liver biopsies need to implement a functional but sufficiently comprehensive diagnostic protocol in order to accurately diagnose the cause of cholestatic liver disease in a given patient.

DISCLAIMER: These materials and all other materials provided in conjunction with continuing medical education activities are intended solely for purposes of supplementing continuing medical education programs for qualified health care professionals. Anyone using the materials assumes full responsibility and all risk for their appropriate use. The SPP makes no warranties or representations whatsoever regarding the accuracy, completeness, currentness, noninfringement, merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose of the materials. In no event will the SPP be liable to anyone for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the materials. In no event should the information in the materials be used as a substitute for professional care.

Claiming CME Credit

Certificates of continuing medical education AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ will be issued through the Society for Pediatric Pathology. CME credits will only be awarded after completion of an online evaluation form.

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