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April 30, 2019

2019 SPP Spring Meeting

SPP Spring 2019 Meeting

March 15th - 17th, 2019
Crystal Gateway Marriott

2019 SPP Spring Meeting Abstract Book
2019 Mobile App Instructions
2019 SPP Spring Meeting Program Book
2019 SPP Spring Meeting Preliminary Agenda
2018 SPP Spring Meeting - Annual Business Meeting Minutes
2019 SPP Spring Meeting - Annual Business Meeting Agenda

SPP COMMITTEE MEETINGS
Spring 2019
Crystal Gateway Marriott
1700 Jefferson Davis Highway
Arlington, VA 22202

Friday, March 15th, 2019
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Executive Committee and Strategic Planning Meeting (closed) Room: Arlington Salon 1
10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Finance Committee Meeting (open) Room: Arlington Salon 1
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. PDP Editorial Board Meeting with Lunch (by invitation) Room: Pentagon
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Publications Committee (open) Room: Manassas
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Fellowship Committee (open) Room: Jackson
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Research and Awards Committee (closed) Room: McLean
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Education Committee Meeting (closed) Room: Mt. Vernon
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Perinatal Committee (open) Room: Manassas
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Practice Committee (open) Room: Jackson
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Membership Committee (open) Room: McLean
4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Slide Survey Subcommittee Working Meeting (closed) Room: Mt. Vernon
4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Board of Directors Meeting (by invitation) Room: Arlington Salon 1

New! CME Early morning interactive sessions:

Saturday, March 16, 2019, 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.: Soft Tissue Tumors and Next Generation Testing: Integration of Histological and Molecular Findings, David Parham, MD, Children's Hospital in Los Angeles

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify key histological features of pediatric sarcomas that lead to diagnostic ancillary testing.
  2. Apply and critique immunohistochemical testing for surrogate markers of pediatric gene fusions.
  3. Appraise and demonstrate the use of next generation sequencing in the diagnosis of pediatric sarcomas.

Sunday, March 17, 2019, 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.: The Transition From an Academic to a Leadership Career in Pathology, Megan Delaney, DO, MPH, Children's National Health System

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Distinguish some of the essential skills for leadership positions in pathology.
  2. Differentiate how leadership positions differ from other roles
  3. Formulate steps in your career that may prepare you for a leadership position.

Schedule of Events:

Committee Meetings – March 15th, 2019

Scientific and Educational Sessions – March 16th, 2019 and March 17th, 2019

Symposium: “Lymph Node Pathology for the Pediatric Pathologist"
Andrea N. Marcogliese MD, Baylor College of Medicine, M. Kamran Mirza, MD PhD, Loyola University Medical Center, Aliya N. Husain, MD, University of Chicago, Kevin E. Fisher, MD, PhD, Texas Children’s Hospital, Carl Allen MD, PhD, Texas Children's Cancer Center

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the 2016 updates to pediatric lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders in the WHO classification of pediatric hematologic malignancies
  • Use touch preparations and review fine needle aspirate smears to accurately assess lymphoid tissue and select appropriate testing to make a diagnosis and make best use of tissue, especially when limited, and utilize a comprehensive yet cost effective approach to the diagnosis of lymphoid lesions
  • Integrate molecular diagnostic data into diagnostic algorithms and appropriately order and interpret test results in the context of a diagnostic work up of lymphoma and select appropriate ancillary studies that identify potential prognostic and/or therapeutic markers relevant to lymphomas

    Workshop Session I


    A. Year 1/3
    : Role of Bias in Pediatric Pathology: Preventing Errors and Enhancing Patient Safety One Child at a Time. Vinay Prasad, MD, Monroe Carrell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Kathleen Nicol, MD, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University

    This is an ABPath approved Patient Safety Course, and would carry Improvement in Medical Practice credit in addition to CME and SAM credits to participants who fulfill the CME and SAM requirements

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Identify different cognitive biases that can cause errors
  • Participants will be able to utilize de-biasing strategies, thereby preventing errors
  • Participants will understand the dual processing system that we use every day, and utilize their understanding of Type 1 (intuitive) and Type 2 (analytic) processes to avoid errors and failure.

B. Year 2/3: Bone dysplasias: A systematic diagnostic approach - Linda Ernst, MD, Northshore University Healthsystem, Evanston Hospital and Peter Nikkels, MD, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the diagnostic histological aspects of some common skeletal dysplasia’s recognizable at birth.
  • Describe the diagnostic features of the X-rays of several common skeletal dysplasias recognizable at birth.
  • Recognize the limitations of histology to diagnose a skeletal dysplasia.
  • Use a diagnostic scheme to diagnose the more common skeletal dysplasia’s recognizable at birth.

C. Year 3/3: Pediatric Gastrointestinal Biopsy: An Update on the Diagnosis and Pathogenesis of Pediatric Upper Gastrointestinal Disease - Amy Lowichik, MD, PhD, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT and Raul S. Gonzalez, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the inflammatory findings characteristic of allergic and autoimmune diseases of the pediatric upper gastrointestinal tract.
  • Describe the histologic criteria for pre-malignant and malignant lesions of the pediatric upper gastrointestinal tract.
  • Order and recommend appropriate ancillary testing for common and rare developmental, allergic, autoimmune, pre-malignant and malignant lesions of the pediatric upper gastrointestinal tract.

Workshop Session II

D. Year 1/3: What Can the Placenta Tell Us? Debra S. Heller, MD, Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, Rebecca N. Baergen, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College – New York Presbyterian Hospital

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Diagnose placental lesions with a risk of recurrence in future pregnancies
  • Diagnose placental lesions associated with neurologic injury and stillbirth
  • Understand the terminology used in placental pathology including the Amsterdam Placental Workshop Guidelines

    E. Year 2/3:
    What every pediatric pathologist needs to know: WHO Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System (2016) Pediatric Tumors – Alexander Judkins, MD, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Cynthia Hawkins, MD, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto and Mariarita Santi, MD, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

Cynthia Hawkins:

  • Apply the 2016 WHO Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System to the diagnosis of medulloblastoma
  • Integrate morphologic and molecular results into a comprehensive pathology report for the diagnosis of medulloblastoma
  • Apply immunohistochemical and molecular techniques to determine medulloblastoma molecular subgroup
  • Appreciate the clinical relevance of molecular subgrouping and TP53 mutation status in medulloblastoma

    Alexander Judkins
    :
  • Apply the 2016 WHO Classification of tumors of the Central Nervous System to the diagnosis of pediatric embryonal CNS tumors (non-medulloblastoma)
  • Integrate morphologic and molecular results into a comprehensive pathology report for the diagnosis of pediatric embryonal CNS tumors (non-medulloblastoma).
  • Distinguish AT/RT lacking histological features of rhabdoid differentiation from other pediatric CNS embryonal tumors on the basis of immunohistochemistry and/or molecular analysis of SMARCB1/INI1 and/or SMARCA4/BRG1.
  • Using their molecular profile, distinguish C19MC-altered embryonal tumors from other pediatric embryonal CNS tumors.

    Mariarita Santi:

  • Apply the 2016 WHO Classification of tumors of the Central Nervous System to the diagnosis of pediatric glial tumors
  • Approach the diagnosis of pediatric glial brain tumors using a combination of morphology and molecular diagnostic techniques
  • Distinguish the BRAF mutated glial tumors from the Histone-3 mutated tumors and extrapolate the prognostic implications.
  • Separate the molecular profile of supratentorial ependymomas from the infratentorial
  • Integrate morphologic and molecular results into a comprehensive pathology report.

F. Year 3/3: Challenges in Pediatric Soft Tissue Pathology: A Case-Based Approach to Selected Difficult Cases- Jennifer Black, MD, University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado and Erin R. Rudzinski, MD; Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the distinguishing features and the differential diagnosis for frequently encountered pediatric soft tissue lesions and their histologic mimics.
  • Select appropriate ancillary tests to confirm diagnosis, including a strategic panel of immunohistochemical stains, electron microscopy, conventional cytogenetics analysis and molecular genetic testing.
  • Create a pathology report including all essential information for the diagnosis of an intermediate or malignant soft tissue lesion to facilitate further patient management.

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